National Pollinator Week is Here | PlantTAGG
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National Pollinator Week is Here

pollinator week and gardening

National Pollinator Week is Here

We’re celebrating National Pollinator Week on our blog and social channels, and hope you’ll follow along, like, comment and share the content!

 

National Pollinator Week is June 22-28, 2020. 

 

In 2007, the U.S. Senate unanimously approved the designation of a week in June as National Pollinator Week. The move was a necessary step toward addressing the declining pollinator populations and offers people a way to help protect them. Pollinator Week celebrates bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles – and has grown into an international event. Typically, the week includes in-person gatherings with family, friends and other pollinator enthusiasts, but with COVID-19, many of the celebrations this year are taking place online. 

 

If you’re celebrating, be sure to tag us on social @planttagg along with the  #PollinatorWeek and #planttagg tags!

 

National Pollinator Week is managed by Pollinator Partnership. As part of the organization’s mission to promote the health of pollinators, they offer a ton of resources and ideas for ways you can get involved

 

Here are the recommendations they provide on what we can do for our pollinators:

  • Watch for pollinators. Get connected with nature. Take a walk, experience the landscape and look for pollinators’ midday in sunny, planted areas.
  • Reduce your impact. Reduce or eliminate your pesticide use, increase green spaces, and minimize urbanization. Pollution and climate change affect pollinators, too!
  • Plant for pollinators. Create pollinator-friendly habitat with native flowering plants that supply pollinators with nectar, pollen and homes. 

 

We wrote about plants that can deter wasps (and bees) earlier this year on the blog. Keep these plants in mind if you’re hoping to attract pollinators to your yard and garden:

 

(excerpt) Some plants deter wasps from your patio or garden – and they are visually pleasing for your home exterior as well. Many fragrant plants and delicious vegetables surprisingly keep the wasps away. Some of these items also deter bees, so if you’re hoping to keep your pollinator friends nearby, you may want to choose a different plant to deter wasps. Many of these plants work together as companion plants as well.

 

 

Check back on the blog all week for our Pollinator Week series, and if you’re not following PlantTAGG on Facebook and Instagram, be sure to get in on the fun!

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